Over the past year or so, hemp has been a hot topic. Almost every state legislature has had discussions about the legality of hemp, due to it being a member of the cannabis family – just like marijuana. 

The difference between hemp and marijuana is often improperly explained, leaving patients, lawmakers, and everyone in between a bit confused.

While there are few genetic differences between hemp and marijuana plants, there are drastic differences in terms of cannabis slang, legal interpretation, and use of the plants. If you have been wondering about the difference between hemp and marijuana, as well as their uses and legal status, keep reading on.

What is Hemp?

While the legal definition described above had not been legitimized until the Agricultural Act of 2018 had passed, “hemp” is generally used to describe non-intoxicating Cannabis that is harvested for industrial use.

Hemp has been used throughout history, and many believe that hemp was the first example of human industry. According to Advanced Holistic Health, hemp was first recorded being used as far back as 8,000 BCE – more than 10,000 years ago.

With the capabilities to produce crucial resources such as food, rope, clothing, paper, housing material, and more, hemp has been the catalyst for man’s earliest innovations.

Although hemp is a member of the Cannabis sativa species, it contains very little of the intoxicating compound, THC. However, hemp does contain a good amount of CBD, and in recent years has grown in demand for CBD extraction. Under Federal law, industrial hemp is defined as cannabis plants containing less than 0.3% THC by dry weight.

What is Marijuana?

“Marijuana” is a term used to classify varieties of Cannabis that contain more than 0.3% THC (by dry weight)  and can induce psychotropic or euphoric effects on the user.

Marijuana has been used as a recreational and medicinal drug for centuries. The high levels of THC allow marijuana to cause a “high”, including effects such as euphoria and relaxation.

Marijuana comes in many forms, including sativa and indica varieties. Each strain has different effects, often depending on whether it is sativa-dominant or indica-dominant. Unlike hemp, which is always a sativa, marijuana can be a cross-bred mixture, or hybrid.

Final Thoughts on Hemp and Marijuana

 Although hemp and marijuana both come from the Cannabis species, they are very different. Hemp and marijuana have both been around for centuries, and both serve distinctly beneficial purposes.

Questions about medical marijuana in Missouri? The team at Flora Farms is standing by to help answer any questions you might have. Our medical marijuana dispensaries will open in Neosho, Springfield, and Humansville MO later this Fall 2020. 

Over the past year or so, hemp has been a hot topic. Almost every state legislature has had discussions about the legality of hemp, due to it being a member of the cannabis family – just like marijuana. 

The difference between hemp and marijuana is often improperly explained, leaving patients, lawmakers, and everyone in between a bit confused.

While there are few genetic differences between hemp and marijuana plants, there are drastic differences in terms of cannabis slang, legal interpretation, and use of the plants. If you have been wondering about the difference between hemp and marijuana, as well as their uses and legal status, keep reading on.

What is Hemp?

While the legal definition described above had not been legitimized until the Agricultural Act of 2018 had passed, “hemp” is generally used to describe non-intoxicating Cannabis that is harvested for industrial use.

Hemp has been used throughout history, and many believe that hemp was the first example of human industry. According to Advanced Holistic Health, hemp was first recorded being used as far back as 8,000 BCE – more than 10,000 years ago.

With the capabilities to produce crucial resources such as food, rope, clothing, paper, housing material, and more, hemp has been the catalyst for man’s earliest innovations.

Although hemp is a member of the Cannabis sativa species, it contains very little of the intoxicating compound, THC. However, hemp does contain a good amount of CBD, and in recent years has grown in demand for CBD extraction. Under Federal law, industrial hemp is defined as cannabis plants containing less than 0.3% THC by dry weight.

What is Marijuana?

“Marijuana” is a term used to classify varieties of Cannabis that contain more than 0.3% THC (by dry weight)  and can induce psychotropic or euphoric effects on the user.

Marijuana has been used as a recreational and medicinal drug for centuries. The high levels of THC allow marijuana to cause a “high”, including effects such as euphoria and relaxation.

Marijuana comes in many forms, including sativa and indica varieties. Each strain has different effects, often depending on whether it is sativa-dominant or indica-dominant. Unlike hemp, which is always a sativa, marijuana can be a cross-bred mixture, or hybrid.

Final Thoughts on Hemp and Marijuana

 Although hemp and marijuana both come from the Cannabis species, they are very different. Hemp and marijuana have both been around for centuries, and both serve distinctly beneficial purposes.

Questions about medical marijuana in Missouri? The team at Flora Farms is standing by to help answer any questions you might have. Our medical marijuana dispensaries will open in Neosho, Springfield, and Humansville MO later this Fall 2020.